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Stories Tagged - Municipal Development Plan

Courtesy Morrison Homes Multi-Family

June 20, 2018 | Gerald Vander Pyl

Embracing density

Builders and the City work together to rein in urban sprawl

It used to be that mentioning the word "density" would get some Calgarians riled up over plans for a new community they felt had too many homes per hectare, or a condominium project with too many units.
But faced with the alternative of urban sprawl, increasing density is now an established policy for residential development.

In 2009, city council approved a new Municipal Development Plan (MDP) and Calgary Transportation Plan (CTP) that address density in both new communities and established areas.

Courtesy KGL Constructors

June 18, 2018 | Geoff Geddes

A community divided

Lakeview ring road letter drives controversy

It sounded innocuous at first: a letter from the Lakeview Community Association to the province and the City of Calgary to reconsider plans for a portion of the Southwest Ring Road that would link the neighbourhood to a Tsuut'ina development. If you're wondering what could possibly go wrong, the answer is just about everything.

The letter was prompted by concerns that some Lakeview residents expressed about increased traffic that might come with the new $4.5-billion development planned for the Tsuut'ina First Nation. The development would include retail, residential and entertainment elements, and at least one access point at the 5600 block of 37th Street S.W.

The proposed Anderson Station transit-oriented development would cover 19.9 acres and create a pedestrian-friendly urban village in the area.
Courtesy City of Calgary

March 07, 2018 | Mario Toneguzzi

Buses, trains and automobiles

Plans for Anderson Station transit-oriented development approach final approval

A new outline plan and land use application for the lands surrounding the Anderson LRT Station was approved at the Calgary Planning Commission in February and will now go before city council on April 16 for final approval.

Doug Cassidy, director of real estate and development services for the City of Calgary, said Anderson Station has many characteristics that make it viable as a transit-oriented development (TOD) site.

A conceptual rendering of Brookfield Residential’s upcoming Rowan Park development, demonstrating the company's vision for four-season living in the community.
Courtesy Brookfield Residential

Jan. 17, 2018 | Barb Livingstone

Gateway to the west

New developments on Calgary's western edge hope to raise the bar for active, outdoor living

Two major developments in Calgary's northwest will soon solidify the area's reputation as the gateway to Rocky Mountain recreation and winter adventure.

While the nearby Trans-Canada Highway will guide future residents towards mountain playgrounds in Canmore and Banff, the communities of Rowan Park and Medicine Hill will offer their own built-in recreational amenities.

The in-the-works University District is an example of a new community that will be built around the concept of hub living.
Courtesy West Campus Development Trust

Dec. 06, 2017 | Kathleen Renne

Connected communities

Hub living is the name of the game when it comes to new-neighbourhood design in northwest Calgary

When discussing the current trend of building Calgary residential communities around "hubs" (also known as "activity centres" or "nodes"), the phrase "back to the future" seems apt.

"It's about concentrating uses and activities in one area ... It's how settlements and civilizations have been developing forever," said Beverly Sandalack, associate dean and professor of landscape architecture and planning in the University of Calgary's Faculty of Environmental Design.

"It fell out of favour post-World War II with the over-reliance on the car, but, except for this 50-year aberration, main streets have always been the centre of community activity and business."

City of Calgary planner Desmond Bliek  says the Main Streets initiative involved one of the largest public engagement processes in the City’s history.
Wil Andruschak / For CREB®Now

Oct. 05, 2017 | Barb Livingstone

Main-street makeover

City of Calgary Main Streets initiative aims to revitalize streetscapes and bring communities together

In late September, a throng of Bridgeland residents turned out for the first annual community-organized passeggiata, visiting cultural and business stops along the neighbourhood's main thoroughfare, ending in celebration at the street's General Square.

This passeggiata — a leisurely promenade or stroll in the Italian tradition — and other activities like it are exactly what the City of Calgary's Main Streets initiative is designed to encourage across 24 different city streets.

Council approval of a new Municipal Development Plan in 2009 was the catalyst for a number of changes to how the city has grown.
Getty Images

Oct. 05, 2017 | Gerald Vander Pyl

Inward growth

City continues process of intensification, as communities adjust to higher-density living

For a long time, news stories about development in Calgary tended to paint a picture of a city growing out of control, with headlines like "Calgary battles urban sprawl" or "Calgary versus the car: the city that declared war on urban sprawl."

Rylan Graham, an instructor in the University of Calgary's Faculty of Environmental Design, says after the Second World War, much of the population growth in cities occurred on the urban-rural fringe.

"This is the form of growth that is often connected with the term urban sprawl," he said. "Generally, planning has come to recognize the ills of urban sprawl – that it is unsustainable socially, economically and environmentally."


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