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Stories Tagged - High River

Courtesy of the Calgary Metropolitan Region Board

July 29, 2020 | Natalie Noble

Make your voice heard in CMRB public engagement process

A rapidly growing population in the Calgary area will impact surrounding communities now and in the future.

From families to businesses, decision-making around infrastructure investment, economic well-being and environmentally responsible land use is a big deal. That's why the Calgary Metropolitan Region Board (CMRB) is prioritizing public input as it plans for the area's future.

Courtesy Neville Palmer

Oct. 23, 2019 | Andrea Cox

High River: Rejuvenated riverside town has bounced back from 2013 floods

The town of High River, located 30 minutes south of Calgary on the banks of the Highwood River, has bounced back from the trials and tribulations of the 2013 floods with grace and determination.

July 31, 2019 | CREBNow

Calgary Mid-Year Housing Market Outlook

Highlighting key Calgary-and-area housing market and economic data from the first half of 2019, while looking ahead to what the rest of the year might hold.

Feb. 23, 2018 | Kathleen Renne

Small Towns on the Big Screen

High River and Okotoks are burgeoning film hubs

Even for those who don't watch CBC's family-drama series Heartland – now in its 11th season – the town of High River has become synonymous with the show.

"Heartland has become a part of the community," said Irene Kerr, the curator and director of High River's Museum of the Highwood. High River poses as the town of Hudson on Heartland. One of the show's most well-known locales, Maggie's Diner, is a building right along High River's Main Street.

"We noticed a shift around 2015, when people who were visiting High River stopped asking about the 2013 flood and wanted to see where they were filming Heartland," said Kerr.

Cody Stuart / CREB®Now

July 12, 2017 | Geoff Geddes

Farmland finance

A novel place to plant your savings

Given the fickle Canadian climate, farming for a living is often viewed as a risky proposition. Buying farmland, however, is attracting some interest from Calgary investors seeking a hedge against inflation that will also produce goods and generate income.

The two most common ways to make money from farmland are capital appreciation – when the land increases in value - and income. That income can be from cash rent, calculated by dollars per cultivated acre, or a crop share, where the investor receives a share of the total crop sales each year, usually about 20-30 per cent.

"Farmland has been a tremendous investment over the last 10 years," said J.P. Gervais, chief agricultural economist for Farm Credit Canada. "Not only have land values been rising, but returns from farming have been very strong, with farm cash receipts increasing on a national level by an average of $2 billion a year for the past decade."

Aerial view of downtown High River during the annual River City Classics Show n’ Shine Car show. Photo courtesy Kirk Davis

March 23, 2017 | Marty Hope

Reinventing High River

Hard work and resilience has turned High River into a reinvigorated, thriving community


There were doubters, those who believed High River couldn't possibly survive the devastation of the 2013 flood.


Well, they're being proven wrong.


"The town utilized a 'build it back better' mentality," said Jodi Dawson, the town's manager of economic development.


After spending more than $100 million on flood mitigation to protect new and existing residents and businesses, High River is back a bit bigger, and definitely better, than before.


CREB® past president Jim Ross has worked in High River for nearly four decades, noting the town continues to evolve alongside the regional housing market. Photo by Michelle Hofer/For CREB®Now

Oct. 24, 2016 | Cailynn Klingbeil

55 Years of Calgary Real Estate: 1996 CREB® President Jim Ross

CREB® past president Jim Ross labels digital revolution in 1996 as a game-changer

It was the cusp of the modern-day tech revolution, and Jim Ross had the best seat in the house.

"The Internet was quite new, and we were just coming to grips with the best way to head down that road," said the CREB® past president, who guided the local real estate industry in 1996 through increasing demand for digital alternatives. "At that time, we had no idea what the impact of the Internet would be, how universal it would become.

Still buzzing with plenty of activity in new-home construction, Airdrie sales activity slowed in 2016 but hasn’t dropped compared to five-year averages. Photo by Carl Patzel/For CREB®Now

Aug. 12, 2016 | Carl Patzel

Mirror image

Satellite communities showing similar signs of strain; officials still optimistic

Feeling the pinch of a slowing economy, smaller satellite community housing markets have mirrored a downward drift in prices compared with Calgary but continue to be an attractive draw for buyers.

Depending on the region, CREB®'s mid-year forecast update has shown only a slight reduction in sales compared to long-term trends and actual growth in other outlaying districts.

Still buzzing with plenty of activity in new-home construction, Airdrie sales activity slowed in 2016 but hasn't dropped compared to five-year averages. A continual inventory build-up has kept new listings on pace with the past three years for Airdrie, which experienced a 5.37 per cent population growth since last summer and has recently surpassed 60,000 residents.

Becky Walters, who retired from real estate in 1995 and moved to Vancouver Island, said it has been “quite an adjustment” leaving the business. Photo courtesy Becky Walters.

July 21, 2016 | Cailynn Klingbeil

55 Years of Real Estate: 2013 CREB® Past President Becky Walters

Former CREB® president Becky Walters remembers how communities rallied in following natural disaster in 2013

Becky Walters remembers 2013 like most Calgarians do – one equally fraught with harrowing tales of devastation and inspiring stories of community spirit following a historic flood that left many communities underwater.

In June 2013, Alberta experienced heavy rainfall that sparked 32 states of local emergency in communities throughout southern Alberta and resulted in billions of dollars in insurable damages.

"It was something that affected the whole city, of course," said Walters, who, six months earlier, had become president of CREB®.

Housing developments such as Mattamy's Southwinds project are expected to add supply to Airdire's market in 2016. Photo by Carl Patzel/For CREB®Now

Jan. 12, 2016 | Carl Patzel

Familiar playbook

Surrounding region's housing market to be similarly impacted by sluggish economy: CREB®

The resale residential housing market surrounding Calgary is expected to feel the pinch from a sluggish provincial economy, with prices facing downward pressure from slower sales activity.

In CREB®'s 2016 Economic Outlook & Regional Housing Market Forecast, chief economist Ann-Marie noted Airdrie and the Rockyview and Foothills regions will face similar conditions as that within Calgary.

"The resale residential housing market outside of Calgary will face the same macro-economic influences on housing demand as those within the city in 2016," she said, noting each area will have its own set of circumstances that will influence supply, demand and prices.

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