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Stories Tagged - community development

Brookfield Residential Properties president and CEO Alan Norris initially toyed with becoming a golf pro before turning to a career in residential development. Photo by Adrian Shellard/For CREB®Now.
News

Oct. 01, 2020 | Barb Livingstone

Calgary's urban influencer series: Alan Norris

We've all heard that Rome wasn't built in a day. Neither was Calgary, which continues to undergo an urban renaissance. Over the next five days, CREB®Now will present a series where it has sat down with five influencers who have helped develop the city as we know it today.

The lure of lasting value

He leads a Calgary-based company with assets of $3.2 billion and 1,100 employees in 12 different North American markets.

In its 57-year history, the company has developed and built in 62 Calgary neighbourhoods in all four quadrants of the city.

But while Alan Norris's Brookfield Residential Properties has been successful developing communities throughout North America, the president and CEO also leads what may be his biggest task yet: to end homelessness in Calgary.

The 113-hectare D’Arcy development by United Communities in Okotoks will be  bounded on the north by the town boundary, on the south by Sandstone Gate, on the east by Northridge Drive, and on the west by the D’Arcy Ranch golf course. Photo courtesy United Communities.
News

Nov. 15, 2016 | Marty Hope

Cultivating new roots

Two historic parcels of Okotoks land to be redeveloped for future generations

Once homesteading land for the D'Arcy and Wedderburn families, two historically significant properties in north Okotoks are to be redeveloped for a new generation of families.

United Communities has purchased approximately 178 hectares of farmland on both sides of Northridge Drive as sites for a pair of mixed use communities — simply to be called D'Arcy and Wedderburn.

Ward 3 Coun. Jim Stevenson and Brookfield President and CEO Alan Norris were both on hand for the launch of the new Livingston community in north Calgary. Sales in the master-planned development are expected to start early next year. Photo by Wil Andruschak/for CREB®Now
News

June 30, 2016 | Alex Frazer Harrison

Veil lifted

Livingston to eventually house 30,000 people

Calgary's newest community came online this week as Brookfield Residential lifted the veil on its new Livingston development in the city's north that, when completed, will house as many as 30,000 people.

Covering more than 500 hectares straddling Centre Street north of Stoney Trail, Livingston is the first master-planned community in north Calgary within the past 20 years. It will include an estimated 10,000 homes, and will be anchored by a major activity centre that will include an estimated one million square feet of retail and institutional space,

Ward 3 Coun. Jim Stevenson, who attended the official construction launch June 28, calls Livingston "a new city north of the ring road."

Qualico Communities communications manager Maribeth Janikowski, pictured in the builder's Augusta show home in southwest Calgary, believes the economy has created opportunities in the lower-priced segments. Photo by Adrian Shellard/For CREB®Now
News

Dec. 23, 2015 | Andrea Cox

Setting the pace

Slowdown welcomed by new home industry

Local homebuilders and developers say they are heading into 2016 feeling positive after going through a year that brimmed with economic challenges.

"It's definitely been an interesting year," said Wendy Jabusch, president of the Canadian Home Builders' Association – Calgary Region and a vice-president with Brookfield Residential.

In particular, housing demand fell sharply in 2015 as the provincial economy sputtered through an oil patch slowdown that eventually led to pronounced job losses.

Subdivisions' encroachment on agricultural land has increasingly become a hot-button topic, says Tim Dietzler, an agricultural expert Rocky View County. Photo by Adrian Shellard/For CREB®Now
News

Nov. 13, 2015 | Joel Schlesinger

Subdivision, meet country

New developments increasingly designed to minimize impact on agricultural neighbours

A suburban home with a two-car garage is hardly what most people would call a potential threat to our nation's food security.

Yet as subdivisions push evermore into rural areas — with neighbourhoods bordering on fields of wheat and other crops — their impact on agricultural land has increasingly become a hot-button topic, says Tim Dietzler, an agricultural expert with Rocky View County.

"This is not a new issue in this area or any area in Alberta with development new agricultural land," he says. "But many municipalities now pay much more attention to the potential problems that can arise."

Hamptons Golf Club
News

Nov. 13, 2015 | Barb Livingstone

Par for the course

Local golf courses facing common plight

Two proposed residential redevelopment projects on Calgary golf courses are at the tipping point of an economic sustainability challenge hitting the golf industry throughout North America.

A proposal for new homes in two pocket areas at the Hamptons Golf Club — to support a substantial overhaul of the golf course itself — and the proposed closure of the nine-hole Harvest Hills Golf Course for the construction of single and multi-family homes, are working their way through community consultation and city application processes.

Hamptons Golf Course Ltd. has released preliminary concepts for northwest Calgary club's redevelopment, which would see a reconfiguration of the existing 18-hole course that would facilitate the construction of 35 to 65 new homes.

Habitat for Humanity Southern Alberta president and CEO Gerrad Oishi says this past September, his organization helped provide 14 families with keys to homes in Qualico Developments’ Redstone project in the northeast. Photo by Wil Andruschak/for CREB®Now
News

Nov. 09, 2015 | Barb Livingstone

Mission possible

Affordable housing advocates bullish on possible changes

By the end of this year, at least 200 middle-income Calgarians will have bought what may have seemed financially impossible in the city's now waning hot economy: their own home.

Another two dozen families will, in 2015, aided by many hours of sweat equity instead of a down payment, have entered home ownership.

Yet these Calgarians, who became homebuyers this year through Attainable Homes Calgary Corporation (AHCC) and Habitat for Humanity, might not be the only ones stepping into a more affordable housing market in the near future.

By December, significant changes are expected to the City of Calgary's administrative policies to make growth in the overall housing market both more efficient and less costly.

Suzanne Maynard, her husband Gord Clark and daughters Sydney, 3, and Evelynn, 6, enjoying spending warm summer days and nights at their private community lake. Photo by Paula Trotter/Fore CREB®Now.
News

Aug. 23, 2015 | Paula Trotter

Home sweet homeowners' association

Getting a head's up on HOA fees

When school let out this year, Suzanne Maynard and her two young daughters joined a cohort of neighbours at Lake Bonavista for a summer kick-off party.

Unlimited access to the private beach is worth every penny of the Homeowner Association (HOA) fee Maynard says she and her husband pay annually.

"We truly believe it's the best $288 we spend in a year," she says. "The money that goes towards the community is priceless – it provides endless entertainment for our kids and we have got to know our neighbours down at the lake."


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CREB® acknowledges that its office is located, and that its REALTOR® members serve, on the traditional territories of the peoples of the Treaty 7 region and Métis Nation of Alberta, Region 3. We honour and acknowledge the members of the Métis community and specifically, the Métis Nation Region 3. In the spirit of reconciliation and because we are all treaty people, we also acknowledge all Calgarians who make our homes in the traditional Treaty 7 territory of Southern Alberta.


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