REALTORS® serving Calgary and area

 

CREB Now Logo

Calgary's trusted source of real estate news, advice and statistics since 1983.

 


Stories Tagged - Transportation

Courtesy of Wade's House Moving

March 15, 2021 | Gerald Vander Pyl

Under the right circumstances, moving a house can be a win-win for buyers and sellers

Now and then, Calgarians going for a morning walk in their community are stunned to discover that a house on their street has disappeared overnight.

No, the house wasn't whisked away by a tornado like in The Wizard of Oz – it's all part of a a way to "recycle" homes that ends up benefiting landowners in two locations.
Federation of Calgary Communities urban planner Carrie Yap said more pedestrian-friendly environment could include anything from wider sidewalks and wayfinding signage and landmarks to direct connections via pathways and linear parks. Photo by Wil Andruschak/For CREB®Now

Aug. 13, 2019 | Alex Frazer Harrison

The why of walkability

Experts tout prevalence in today's homebuying decisions

Walkability has evolved from a buzzword to an influential part of home purchasing decisions in Calgary, say real estate experts.

And to meet growing demand for improved accessibility, developers and planners need to start now by designing communities of tomorrow through a more pedestrian-friendly lens.

"(Walkability) is important to our customers," said Brookfield Residential development manager Tara Steell. "We're hearing from them and using best practices to create communities with master-planned communities. We have the ability to influence that and try to get people out of their cars."

Yeatland Wong, senior engineer for intelligent transportation systems with the City of Calgary, at the traffic management centre along Spiller Road S.E. Photo by Wil Andruschak/For CREB®Now

Dec. 16, 2016 | Joel Schlesinger

Road smarts

City delves into intelligent traffic technologies in preparation of autonomous future

There's method to the madness that is Calgary's rush-hour traffic.

And if autonomous vehicles play into mainstream society the way many are predicting, our city could be at the forefront of changing that daily commute, suggest local officials.

While drivers stuck in gridlock may feel differently, Calgary currently operates one of the most advanced traffic systems in Canada – a claim backed up earlier year in a TomTom Traffic Index survey that identified Calgary as the least congested city in Canada.

Dec. 05, 2016 | Tom Babin

A changed city

Future of bike lanes rests in council's hands as Calgary struggles with commuter culture

tom-babinA few years ago, I stumbled out of a downtown nightclub during the Sled Island music festival to head home at a time so sensible that my younger self would have been horrified.

With my ears still ringing from the music, I rounded the corner onto Stephen Avenue and the view stopped me in my tracks. There were bikes, hundreds of them, parked in overflowing racks set up by organizers of the festival, spilling across the pedestrian mall wherever I looked.

As a long-time bicycle commuter in Calgary, I had grown accustomed to having my choice of prime bike parking because there were so few cyclists around. This, however, was different. I could barely find my bike amid the multitudes. I had never seen so many cyclists in Calgary at one place. It felt like a different city.

The rise of ride-sharing could also affect public transit ridership in Calgary, said Greg Morrow, the Richard Parker Professor in Metropolitan Growth and Change at the University of Calgary. Photo by Wil Andruschak/For CREB®Now

Nov. 19, 2016 | Cailynn Klingbeil

The ride-sharing revolution

Uber's impact already being felt in community development, say local officials

While ride-sharing giant Uber has yet to re-enter the Calgary market – a move that could come before the end of the month, and dependent on city council approval of amendments to the ride-share bylaw – the company's influence is already being felt locally, and not just within the transportation industry.

The rise of ride-sharing businesses are causing planners, developers, builders and city officials to rethink how cities are designed. From developers designing neighbourhoods that emphasize walkability to entrepreneurs imagining alternative uses for parking garages, the possibilities are plentiful, said Chris Blaschuk, manager of the transportation strategy division in the City of Calgary's transportation planning department.

The 113-hectare D’Arcy development by United Communities in Okotoks will be  bounded on the north by the town boundary, on the south by Sandstone Gate, on the east by Northridge Drive, and on the west by the D’Arcy Ranch golf course. Photo courtesy United Communities.

Nov. 15, 2016 | Marty Hope

Cultivating new roots

Two historic parcels of Okotoks land to be redeveloped for future generations

Once homesteading land for the D'Arcy and Wedderburn families, two historically significant properties in north Okotoks are to be redeveloped for a new generation of families.

United Communities has purchased approximately 178 hectares of farmland on both sides of Northridge Drive as sites for a pair of mixed use communities — simply to be called D'Arcy and Wedderburn.

Coybow Taxi owner Mohammed Benini said proposed amendments to the City of Airdrie's taxi bylaw will make ride-sharing uneconomical for companies. Photo by Carl Patzel/For CREB®Now

Sept. 23, 2016 | Carl Patzel

Airdrie targets ride-share

Proposed bylaw looks to add stricter regulations

Airdrie's decision to follow suit with other municipalities in the province and regulate controversial ride-sharing services is redundant, costly and unnecessary, said opponents to the proposed amended taxi bylaw.

Earlier this month, the City of Airdrie unveiled the amendment that would require app-based ride-sharing companies like Uber to follow similar regulations as traditional taxi companies.

The change would require all vehicles to undergo 134-point inspections, more involved licensing upgrades requiring Class 1, 2 or 4, background/criminal records checks and hefty commercial insurance rates.

Rocky View 2020 executive director Bruce McAllister says a proposed increase to the county's off-site transportation levy will garner negative attention throughout the province. Photo by Carl Patzel/For CREB®Now

Sept. 02, 2016 | Carl Patzel

When the levee breaks

Opponents decry Rocky View County as CAVE men: 'Citizens Against Virtually Everything'

A far-reaching increase in off-site transportation levy could be a road to nowhere for business, according to a collection of Rocky View County developers and land owners.

Used to fund improvements in the transportation network, generally in subdivisions and new developments, County engineering services have offered a preliminary proposal of a 440 per cent increase in off-site levy over the next four years.

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corp. regional economist Lai Sing Louie said many Calgary homeowners still want the freedom to come and go with a car at their disposal, and they’re willing to pay for it. Photo by Wil Andruschak/For CREB®Now

June 30, 2016 | Joel Schlesinger

Long live the auto

The car-less lifestyle is trending, but Calgary's housing market still driven by the automobile, say experts

Cars aren't going anywhere soon, and neither is Calgary homebuyers' desire for neighbourhoods – or condominiums for that matter – that support their automobile-driven lifestyles, say housing experts.

While much is being made about efforts to create a more pedestrian-friendly city that focuses on "vertical growth," Calgarians still very much enjoy the freedom that comes with driving an automobile. And they
want their residence — whether it's a condo, townhome or single-detached house — to support their yen for putting the pedal to the metal, said Canada Mortgage and Housing Corp. (CMHC) regional economist Lai Sing Louie.

"Most people still want parking," he said. "They want the freedom to come and go with a car at their disposal, and they're willing to pay a lot of money to afford that."

Pedestrian strategy project manager Andrew King said the plan seeks to 
reduce pedestrian fatality collisions to 
four by 2025. Photo by Cody Stuart/Managing Editor

April 29, 2016 | Cody Stuart

Talking the walk

City's new pedestrian strategy heads for city council

With Calgary's push to increase the number of cyclists on city pathways and roadways garnering media attention, City Hall has now turned its attention toward those that get around on two feet rather than two wheels.

Set to go before council on May 2, the City's new pedestrian strategy is aimed at making Calgary a "safer, more enjoyable, and easier" for pedestrians, and could see major changes to the way all Calgarians get around the city.

"We have a very strong program around transit (and) vehicles. Then we had a cycling strategy. So a similar approach is now being levelled toward pedestrians," said project manager Andrew King. "So now we have a pedestrian strategy which really is going to focus on bringing improvements to make walking better and making conditions better for pedestrians."

1 234 |Next


Connect With Us