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Stories Tagged - aging in place

Courtesy Statesman Group

Aug. 28, 2019 | Barb Livingstone

Integrated communities: New senior-living options offer variety and amenities

The new face of "senior living" is barely recognizable compared to the old one.

That evolution means community integration instead of isolation; health, wellness and amenity/meal options for a growing group of active residents; and aging in place with staged support for those with dementia and their caregivers.

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Aug. 28, 2019 | Gerald Vander Pyl

While secondary suites can provide extra income, Calgary families are also using them for loved ones

Calgarians have many options when helping an aging parent find suitable housing, but for some people the solution is right where they live.

So-called "mother-in-law" suites provide a separate space for an elderly parent to live with the assistance of family members just a door away.

Today’s seniors have specific demands when it comes to condos, including senior-friendly designs, nearby amenities for active living, and large suites. 
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Aug. 30, 2017 | Geoff Geddes

The upside of downsizing

Popularity of condo living among seniors is on the rise

When it comes to choosing a home later in life, age often brings thoughtful consideration of what really matters. More and more in Calgary, that wisdom is leading seniors to choose condominiums as the place to live out their golden years.

"Five years ago, when we tracked inner-city demographics, you saw maybe 1-2 per cent of seniors purchasing condos," said Oliver Trutina, vice-president of Calgary-based builder Truman.

"Today, that number is around 20 per cent. Since this is often their third or fourth home purchase, they know what they want and are asking for it."

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Aug. 30, 2017 | Tyler Difley

Aging in place

Major renovations and minor modifications to make any home more accessible and livable for seniors

As Canada's population continues to skew older, more and more seniors want to remain in their homes rather than move into a retirement residence or long-term care facility. This preference for "aging in place" has increased the popularity of several home renovations and modifications that make the home more accessible, and easier to navigate, for older individuals. Here are some of the top aging-in-place renovations.
Denver Brust, vice-president internal with the Ramsay Community Association, said the decision to demolish the local seniors' centre has given the community an opportunity to more closely future development. Photo by Wil Andruschak/For CREB®Now

Nov. 18, 2016 | Gerald Vander Pyl

Turning the page

Ramsay seniors take next steps following demolition of historic hub

Four years after a hailstorm heavily damaged the building, the Ramsay Welcome Centre is coming down as residents begin to discuss what might replace it as part of their community hub.

The local seniors' centre has been located on Eighth Street S.E. since the 1970s. Before that, the building was actually located in West Hillhurst before being moved across the city, explains Denver Brust, vice-president internal with the Ramsay Community Association, adding the current community hall was built next door in the 1980s.

Aging in Place owner Carla Berezowski said Calgary is stuck in the past with old ways of homebuilding. Photo by Wil Andruschak/for CREB®Now

Sept. 30, 2016 | Joel Schlesinger

Breaking barriers

Visitable housing offers more than accessibility for disabled individuals; it could be the future of single family homes in an increasingly aged society. So why isn't it catching on?

Carla Berezowski looks at many of Calgary's new neighbourhoods from the last decade and sees missed opportunities.

A specialist in barrier-free design, the consultant works mostly with aging Calgarians, retrofitting their homes to accommodate mobility needs.

"People are usually reacting to a situation like, 'My mom fell' and they want to make their house accessible to accommodate aging parents," said Berezowski, owner of Aging in Place Calgary.

Multiple reports have the number of seniors in the country doubling 2011 levels by 2036. CREB®Now illustration

July 29, 2016 | Gerald Vander Pyl

Something about SHARP

Seniors officials praise program designed to promote aging in place

Local seniors' housing officials are praising a new provincial government program designed to assist seniors who want to "age in place" in their homes rather than having to move.

The Seniors Home Adaptation and Repair Program (SHARP), approved earlier this month, offers low-interest, home-equity-based loans to seniors, which can be used for renovations or repairs to make a home more suitable for their needs.

John Brown with the University of Calgary said the laneway project represents an innovative solution to aging in place. Photo courtesy University of Calgary.

June 06, 2016 | Alex Frazer Harrison

Time and a place

Seniors' groups welcome potential option to aging in place

Seniors' advocates in Calgary are cautiously praising a city council decision to look at a University of Calgary pilot project that's studying laneway housing as an option to aging in place.

In mid-May, council agreed to support a motion by Coun. Gian-Carlo Cara that would have City administration work with the university as it embarks on the next phase of its Aging-In-Place Laneway Housing project.

Kerby Centre CEO Luanne Whitmarsh called the idea, "a really interesting concept," but added more study needs to be done, such as ensuring that, "it isn't just going to make more isolation.

"Also, what does it look like? If (seniors) still need support and there are people entering the home instead of a grassy front yard, it's a back alley. We have to look at quality of life," she said.

Paul and Jill Robert, pictured with their daughter, are currently building a laneway home in West Hillhurst for Jill's parents, who were looking to be closer to family. Photo by Michelle Hofer/For CREB®Now

March 31, 2016 | Joel Schlesinger

Little house on the alley

Laneway homes could soon turn Calgary's back alleys into thriving mini-communities

Paul and Jill Robert have big plans for the little home they're building on their back lane.

Only the dwelling isn't for them. The Roberts already live in the wartime house in the northwest neighbourhood of West Hillhurst on the same lot where Paul, a professor at the Alberta College of Art and Design, grew up.

Instead, the diminutive back-lane house is for Jill's parents who are selling their home in Edmonton and moving to Calgary to be closer to family.

Senior population in Calgary

Oct. 30, 2015 | Cody Stuart

Seniors shortage

New initiative highlights growing housing concern

The City of Calgary has embarked on a three-year strategy to develop a more "age-friendly" city in light of some estimates that have the local senior population nearly doubling within the next decade.

Dubbed the Seniors Age-Friendly Strategy, the plan calls for the creation of community networks focused on issues such as housing, transportation and mobility.

Proposed actions include increasing the provincial standard for provincially funded affordable housing from 10 to 15 per cent, advocating for sustainable provincial funding for the development of new affordable housing and introducing a Land Use Bylaw Amendment to allow for more secondary suites.

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