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CHBA-UDI Calgary chair Allan Klassen expects the city's new housing industry will continue to face difficult conditions in the first half of 2017, followed by a slow return to normalcy. Photo by Wil Andruschak/for CREB®Now

Signs of recovery

Jan. 10, 2017 | Barb Livingstone


Stories Tagged - chba udi

Marissa Toohey, manager of government relations and committees for the Calgary Region at CHBA - UDI Calgary Region Association, believes there is not a single solution that will solve affordable housing. Photo courtesy Marissa Toohey

Dec. 16, 2016 | CREBNow

Q & A with CHBA-UDI's Marissa Toohey

Housing industry expert discusses everything from affordable housing to the best room in her home

Marissa Toohey has one of the better views of Calgary's housing industry – and we're not talking about the one out of her living room. As manager of government relations and committees for the Calgary Region at CHBA - UDI Calgary Region Association. Toohey works closely with municipalities in the broader region on matters impacting the building and development industry.

CREB®Now recently had the opportunity to sit down with her to chat about everything from affordable housing to a national housing strategy. Here's what she had to say:

Yeatland Wong, senior engineer for intelligent transportation systems with the City of Calgary, at the traffic management centre along Spiller Road S.E. Photo by Wil Andruschak/For CREB®Now

Dec. 16, 2016 | Joel Schlesinger

Road smarts

City delves into intelligent traffic technologies in preparation of autonomous future

There's method to the madness that is Calgary's rush-hour traffic.

And if autonomous vehicles play into mainstream society the way many are predicting, our city could be at the forefront of changing that daily commute, suggest local officials.

While drivers stuck in gridlock may feel differently, Calgary currently operates one of the most advanced traffic systems in Canada – a claim backed up earlier year in a TomTom Traffic Index survey that identified Calgary as the least congested city in Canada.

The rise of ride-sharing could also affect public transit ridership in Calgary, said Greg Morrow, the Richard Parker Professor in Metropolitan Growth and Change at the University of Calgary. Photo by Wil Andruschak/For CREB®Now

Nov. 19, 2016 | Cailynn Klingbeil

The ride-sharing revolution

Uber's impact already being felt in community development, say local officials

While ride-sharing giant Uber has yet to re-enter the Calgary market – a move that could come before the end of the month, and dependent on city council approval of amendments to the ride-share bylaw – the company's influence is already being felt locally, and not just within the transportation industry.

The rise of ride-sharing businesses are causing planners, developers, builders and city officials to rethink how cities are designed. From developers designing neighbourhoods that emphasize walkability to entrepreneurs imagining alternative uses for parking garages, the possibilities are plentiful, said Chris Blaschuk, manager of the transportation strategy division in the City of Calgary's transportation planning department.

Outside of some developments in the Beltiline, cash-for-density fund established by the City is being underutilized by developers. Illustration courtesy of Qualex-Landmark.

Nov. 12, 2016 | Marty Hope

Let's make a deal

Industry spokesperson says construction fund largely going unused

Players in one of the city's most active multi-family construction areas have made limited use of a cash-for-density fund established by the City of Calgary, says a spokesperson for the industry.

While a number of projects have been brought forward related to the Beltline Community Investment Fund (BCIF), the CHBA-UDI Calgary Region Association, the umbrella organization for the builders and developers in and around Calgary, is scratching its head about why the fund hasn't been used more.

CHBA - UDI Calgary Region Association CEO Guy Huntingford is concerned new city charters could potential undo more than three years worth of existing work put into a new Municipal Government Act. Photo by Adrian Shellard/For CREB®Now

Oct. 14, 2016 | Barb Livingstone

Charting a new course

Homebuilding officials warn proposed governmental power shift could impact homebuyers in a big way

Before Calgarians step into a voting booth to elect a new city council a year from now, there could be a whole new ball game of city governance over everything from land assessments to affordable housing and even new taxing powers.

New city charters originally proposed in 2014, and only recently made available for public feedback, are intended to give new powers and responsibilities to Alberta's two largest municipalities. They may affect Calgarians on everything from residential speed limits and fines, environmental protection, integration of land-use and transportation strategies and investment to civic administrative efficiencies that stretch from council roles to establishment of bylaw tribunals.

And there will almost certainly be changes that impact the homebuilding industry, and ultimately homebuyers.

Astoria Custom Homes general manger Danny Raposo said buyers who have money are looking now at this being a good opportunity to buy with the luxury housing market the way it is. Photo by Adrian Shellard/For CREB®Now

Sept. 30, 2016 | Alex Frazer Harrison

Bang for their buck

Luxury buyers want it all including the (second) kitchen sink

Today's homebuyers want more for less – a pattern that is also starting to manifest in the luxury market, say local industry experts.

"There's no question that, like everybody, we've felt the pinch," said Danny Raposo, general manager of Astoria Custom Homes, which is building in Watermark at Bearspaw, just outside the city limits.

Still, Raposo describes 2016 as "a decent year," noting an increased interest in Astoria's Watermark product during the eight weeks prior to mid-September.

Canadian Home Builders’ Association-Alberta CEO Donna Moore said one of the organization’s top concerns when it comes to the development of a national housing strategy is to address affordability for first-time buyers.. Photo by Adrian Shellard/For CREB®Now

Aug. 08, 2016 | Kathleen Renne

Starting out

The changing face of the first home purchase

A starter home has long been understood to mean a dwelling that represents someone's first foray into home ownership.

Mattamy Homes' vice-president of sales and marketing in Calgary, Warren Saunders, says, at its core, "It's a home that offers the best price and the best value for a new family starting out."

Donna Moore, the outgoing co-CEO of the Canadian Home Builders' Association (CHBA) – Urban Development Institute (UDI) Calgary Region Association, qualifies, however, that what constitutes a starter home today is very different from one of 30 years ago.

Jayman’s homes in Mahogany are examples of how 
builders in the city are catering to move-up buyers. Photo courtesy Jayman BUILT.

July 25, 2016 | Kathleen Renne

The next step

Move-up homes driving construction activity, community development, say local housing officials

The head of Calgary's new home industry believes move-up products have become the go-to sector within Calgary's residential construction industry, and will be the backbone of new communities moving forward.

Allan Klassen, who is the newly minted chair of the Canadian Home Builders' Association - Urban Development Institute Calgary Region, said buyers' focus over the last several years has been increasingly focused on detached product priced over $500,000.

"It is the prominent driver in terms of overall growth of new construction," said Klassen, who is also senior vice-president of Calgary housing for Brookfield Residential, which is behind the mixed-use Seton development in the southeast and the recently announced Livingston community in the city's north.


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