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Stories Tagged - federation of Calgary communities

Federation of Calgary Communities urban planner Carrie Yap said more pedestrian-friendly environment could include anything from wider sidewalks and wayfinding signage and landmarks to direct connections via pathways and linear parks. Photo by Wil Andruschak/For CREB®Now

Aug. 13, 2019 | Alex Frazer Harrison

The why of walkability

Experts tout prevalence in today's homebuying decisions

Walkability has evolved from a buzzword to an influential part of home purchasing decisions in Calgary, say real estate experts.

And to meet growing demand for improved accessibility, developers and planners need to start now by designing communities of tomorrow through a more pedestrian-friendly lens.

"(Walkability) is important to our customers," said Brookfield Residential development manager Tara Steell. "We're hearing from them and using best practices to create communities with master-planned communities. We have the ability to influence that and try to get people out of their cars."

Getty Images

Oct. 05, 2017 | Geoff Geddes

Calgary's housing future

Trends shaping the city's short- and long-term development

Absent a crystal ball, the future of housing in Calgary is very much up in the air. At the same time, there are some notable trends that offer clues to what's on the horizon for the curious, the concerned and those who just like to plan ahead.

"I think the findings from the 2016 census highlight changes in the Calgary housing market," said Rylan Graham, a sessional instructor in the Faculty of Environmental Design at the University of Calgary.

"We saw significant growth in many of the inner-city neighborhoods developed pre-World War II, and at the periphery of the city through new greenfield development. These areas are where most of the population growth occurred from 2011-2016."

Cody Stuart / CREB®Now

June 08, 2017 | Kathleen Renne

SHIFT conference promises opportunity to "experience the future of Calgary"

"It is time to SHIFT or get off the pot!" That's the call to action Pathways 2 Sustainability – Alberta's Sustainable Communities Initiative – has issued in advance of its upcoming conference, SHIFT, which takes place June 15-17 at the St. Louis Hotel in Calgary's East Village.

SHIFT promises attendees an opportunity to "Experience the Future of Calgary – the SHIFT to a resilient society and new economy and what it means for our city."

"We have a changing political landscape in Alberta and Canada that's moving to adopt climate resilience in the ways in which we build, design and manage communities and community systems, including food systems, energy systems and transportation systems," said SHIFT co-ordinator and Pathways 2 Sustainability executive director, Lisa Fox.

Dave McCarrel stands next to a new outdoor fitness park in Valley Ridge that opened earlier this fall. McCarrle has kept active within the local community association over the past 20 years because he feels it has helped make Valley Ridge a better place to live. Photo by Wil Andruschak/For CREB®Now

Nov. 19, 2016 | Gerald Vander Pyl

New life for community associations

City looking at ways to keep Calgarians engaged

When Dave McCarrel moved to the northwest community of Valley Ridge, he became involved in the local community association to meet people.

That was 20 years ago, and McCarrel has been active ever since.

He helped lead efforts in 2008 to build an outdoor ice rink now recognized as one of the best in the city, and also a recent project to construct an outdoor fitness park equipped with a variety of exercise stations that opened in September.

Dave McCarrel stands next to a new outdoor fitness park in Valley Ridge that opened earlier this fall. McCarrle has kept active within the local community association over the past 20 years because he feels it has helped make Valley Ridge a better place to live. Photo by Wil Andruschak/For CREB®Now

Nov. 19, 2016 | CREBNow

New life for community associations

City looking at ways to keep Calgarians engaged

When Dave McCarrel moved to the northwest community of Valley Ridge, he became involved in the local community association to meet people.

That was 20 years ago, and McCarrel has been active ever since.

He helped lead efforts in 2008 to build an outdoor ice rink now recognized as one of the best in the city, and also a recent project to construct an outdoor fitness park equipped with a variety of exercise stations that opened in September.

Sarina Homes founder Naz Virani is complimentary of the City of Calgary's approach in consulting with industry and the public as it relates to infill development. Photo by Wil Andruschak/For CREB®Now

Sept. 23, 2016 | Andrea Cox

The future of infills

City revisiting inner-city development

Almost 15 years ago, Naz Virani made the shift from chef to homebuilder and developer. Since then, he has been one of a handful of builders at the fore of Calgary's gentrification.

In the early 2000s, Virani founded Sarina Homes, and began what he describes as a journey to transform the inner-city, one infill home at a time.

"A lot has changed since we started the business," he recalled. "We started out building single-family homes, then moved into semi-detached and then fourplex designs."

CREB® chief economist Ann-Marie Lurrie said the price of homes in Calgary's sandwich communities is predicated primarly on land value. Photo by Adrian Shellard/For CREB®Now

Sept. 07, 2016 | Joel Schlesinger

Stuck in the middle

Calgary's aging sandwich communities seek their place in shifting housing landscape

What's old is new again. It's an apt description of homebuyers' newfound interest in Calgary's sandwich communities – those not-quite-inner-city neighbourhoods that long outgrown their suburban roots.

Built along what was then the city's outskirts starting in the late 1950s, these detached-heavy communities such as Thorncliffe, Huntington Hills, Ogden, Winston Heights, Albert Park, Fairview and Kingsland represented optimism and prosperity synonymous with the post-Second World War era.

Fast-forward several generations later and upwardly mobile generation-Xers and millennials are returning to their birth places, attracted by location, ample amenities and familiarity.

Multiple reports have the number of seniors in the country doubling 2011 levels by 2036. CREB®Now illustration

July 29, 2016 | Gerald Vander Pyl

Something about SHARP

Seniors officials praise program designed to promote aging in place

Local seniors' housing officials are praising a new provincial government program designed to assist seniors who want to "age in place" in their homes rather than having to move.

The Seniors Home Adaptation and Repair Program (SHARP), approved earlier this month, offers low-interest, home-equity-based loans to seniors, which can be used for renovations or repairs to make a home more suitable for their needs.

CREB®Now Archive

April 28, 2016 | Caitlin Crawshaw

Connecting communities

How social media is bringing Calgarians together

When the Green Line is complete, it will add 40 kilometres of track to the city's 59-kilometre LRT system and link North Pointe and Seton to downtown. Eventually, it will serve 41 million passengers annually and link Calgary's neighbourhoods like never before.

As with any large development project, the City of Calgary has been consulting with the community during the design process. And to that end, they've been relying heavily on social media to get the word out.

"We've been using a number of social media channels, primarily Facebook and Twitter," said Julie Yepishina-Geller, Green Line communications co-ordinator for the City.

Bev Sandalack, associate dean (academic) with the University of Calgary's Faculty of Design, with Parkdale Community Association president Colin Brandt at the Parkdale Garden. Photo by Wil Andruschak/For CREB®Now

Nov. 23, 2015 | Alex Frazer Harrison

Landmark agreement

FCC, U of C join forces to support community development

A new agreement between the Federation of Calgary Communities and University of Calgary aims to offer students real-world urban-planning experience, valuable data for community planners and some certainty for homeowners.

The agreement with the university's Faculty of Environmental Design (EVDS) formalizes ongoing efforts to get students into the field, aiding community associations in conducting research, consulting residents and coming up with planning documents to guide future growth and redevelopment.

"This partnership is really critical from the point of view of having access to experience and skills (community associations) wouldn't otherwise have access to," said FCC president Leslie Evans, whose federation has some 150 member associations.


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